Find out everything you need to know about Permitted Development Rules

Understanding and knowing about building regulations is tricky as it seems really complicated, however, it is really important to know what you can and can’t do when it comes to extending your home. Find out everything you need to know in our Permitted Development Rules article from Guardian Roofs UK.

The following information we have provided is taken from the sources noted, is lengthy and quite complicated but don’t be alarmed as at Guardian Roofs UK we will help you with all of these aspects. We understand that the rules around Permitted Development, Planning Permission and Building regulations are complicated if you haven’t had experience with them before which is why we offer a full design, planning and installation service for your home improvements which includes all of the guidance you need for these important aspects.

Whether you want to extend your home with a Guardian Extension, replace your existing extension or replace your conservatory roof with a new Guardian Warm Roof or add a whole new conservatory to your home, we will know and explain what will be involved including; if it will be allowed under the permitted development rights, if you will need planning permission or building control and will help you with all of the processes involved.

Quick Read – You Do Not Need Planning Permission If…

Single-storey extension, this means it can be up to 6m from the original rear wall of an attached house (or 8m on a detached property) and up to 4m in height. If your extension is to be within 2m of your property’s boundary, the eaves height is limited to 3m.

Double-storey extension, it can’t be taller than the highest part of your existing roof; mustn’t extend beyond the rear wall by more than 3m; must be at least 7m from the boundary; be built-in materials to match the original structure; no two-storey extensions can be made to the front of the house, or to any wall parallel to the highway.

Full Read – The Detailed Explanation

What is Permitted Development?

Permitted Development allows a homeowner to extend their home without the need for planning permission if it is within certain guidelines and size, and these rules also apply when you want to make improvements to your home which may include; extending your home with a first floor Guardian Extension or a new Guardian Conservatory, or Replacing your existing Conservatory Roof with a new Guardian Warm Roof.

Permitted Development Guidance from GOV.UK

(This information is taken from GOV.UK)

Permitted development rights, allow householders to improve and extend their homes without the need to apply for planning permission where that would be out of proportion with the impact of works carried out.

This technical guidance has been produced to help homeowners understand how they can exercise their rights to carry out development while protecting the interests of their neighbours and the wider environment. It is designed to be used by anyone who wants to understand more about the detailed rules on householder permitted development and the terms used in those rules. Permitted development rights to allow householders to improve and extend their homes without the need to apply for planning permission where that would be out of proportion with the impact of works carried out. Larger single-storey rear extensions are subject to a neighbour consultation scheme (see page 19). It is important that homeowners understand how they can exercise their rights to carry out development while protecting the interests of their neighbours and the wider environment. The structure of the rules on permitted development

The rules on permitted development, set out in Schedule 2 of the Order, are sub-divided into a series of Parts. Part 1 specifically deals with development within the curtilage of a
house. Part 1 is then sub-divided into Classes covering various types of development:

Class A covers the enlargement, improvement or alterations to a house such as rear or side extensions as well as general alterations such as new windows and doors. From 30
May 2013 to 30 May 2019 a neighbour consultation scheme for larger rear extensions
under Class A is required.

Class B covers additions or alterations to roofs which enlarge the house such as loft conversions involving dormer windows.

Class C covers other alterations to roofs such as re-roofing or the installation of roof lights/windows.

Class D covers the erection of a porch outside an external door.

Class E covers the provision of buildings and other development within the curtilage of the house.

Class F covers the provision of hard surfaces within the curtilage of the house such as driveways.

Class G covers the installation, alteration, or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe.

Class H covers the installation, alteration, or replacement of microwave antenna such as satellite dishes.

There are also other parts of the rules that may be relevant to householders. For example:

Part 2 covers matters such as erection or construction of gates, fences and walls, exterior painting, charging points for electric vehicles and CCTVs. Part 14 covers the installation of domestic microgeneration equipment such as solar panels. When considering whether a development proposal is permitted development, all of the
relevant parts of the rules and all the Classes within those Parts need to be taken into account. For example,

Part 1 Class A prevents the installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe from being permitted development because these works are specifically provided for in Class G subject to the rules set out under that Class. Similarly, changes to the roof of a house are not permitted development under Class A but may be permitted development under Class B or C.

In order to be permitted development, a proposal must meet all the limitations and conditions under each Class relevant to the proposal. It is therefore essential that any proposed household development is considered in the context of the permitted development rules as a whole in order to determine whether it benefits from permitted development rights and therefore does not require an application for planning permission.

For example, where a proposed two-storey extension at the rear of a house has a roof that joins onto the main roof of the original house, the works will need to meet the requirements of both Class A (which covers the enlargement of the house) and Class C (which covers any alterations to the roof) in order to be permitted development. If the works also include the creation of a dormer window to enlarge the roof space, either in the extension or the original roof space, then they would also need to meet the requirements of Class B.

Further restrictions on permitted development. It is important to note that a local planning authority is allowed to remove permitted development rights in some or all of its area by issuing what is known as an Article 4 Direction; or may have removed those rights on the original, or any subsequent, planning permission for the house. Where permitted development rights have been removed in either of these ways a planning application will be needed for development. Before undertaking any development, checks should be undertaken with the local planning authority to determine whether any such restrictions on permitted development have been made.

The remainder of this guidance provides further explanation about the detailed rules covering what improvements can be made to a house and its surroundings as permitted
development. In particular, it provides more details on the limits (for example on size) and the conditions that will need to be complied with if development is to take place without the
need for an application for planning permission. The guidance covers in detail Classes AE of Part 1 of the rules which cover common development projects such as extensions, loft
conversions, alterations to a roof, porches, and buildings on land surrounding the house. The rules for Classes F-H are included in this document for reference but detailed guidance on them is not included, although cross-references are included to other guidance published by the Department for Communities and Local Government.

You can find the full guidance and explanation on Permitted Development here at GOV.UK

What is Planning Permission in England and Wales?

(This information is taken from GOV.UK)PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT RULES UK

When you need it

You’ll probably need planning permission if you want to:

  • build something new
  • make a major change to your building, eg building an extension
  • change the use of your building

To find out if your project will need planning permission, contact your local planning authority (LPA).

When you don’t need it

Some building projects don’t need planning permission. This is known as ‘permitted development rights’.

Building projects that normally have permitted development rights include:

  • industrial premises and warehouses – though there are some limits and conditions
  • some outdoor signs and advertisements – though there are special rules around these
  • demolition – but before you begin you must get approval to demolish from your local planning authority

There are other projects that might not need planning permission, eg projects that will have no impact on your neighbours or the environment. If you think this could apply to your project, check with your Local Planning Authority.

Community Rights in England

If your building project benefits the local community, and the community supports it, you may not have to go through the normal planning permission process. Neighbourhood planning and Community Right to Build lets your community grant planning permission directly under certain circumstances.

After you apply

Your local planning authority (LPA) will decide whether to grant planning permission for your project based on its development plan. It will not take into account whether local people want it.

To decide whether a planning application fits with its development plan, an LPA will look at:

  • the number, size, layout, siting and external appearance of buildings
  • the infrastructure available, eg roads and water supply
  • any landscaping needs
  • what you want to use the development for
  • how your development would affect the surrounding area, eg if it would create lots more traffic

In most cases, planning applications are decided within 8 weeks. In England, for unusually large or complex applications the time limit is 13 weeks. If the decision takes longer, you can appeal.

Appeals

If your application is refused, try to come to an agreement with the local planning authority (LPA) by adjusting your plans.

If you can’t reach an agreement, you can appeal.

Appeals can take several months to be decided.

What you can appeal against

You can only appeal against a decision if the LPA:

  • refuses your application
  • grants permission but with conditions you object to
  • refuses to change or remove a condition of planning permission that has been granted with conditions
  • refuses to approve something reserved under an ‘outline permission’ – planning permission for a general idea, not of a specific plan
  • refuses to approve something that you were told to build by your LPA as part of previous planning permission, ie the previous planning permission was granted ‘with conditions’ and the current development was one of the conditions
  • does not make a decision on the application within the deadline and doesn’t get your written consent to change the deadline
  • serves you with an enforcement notice because it thinks you have broken planning permission and you don’t agree

When do you need approval and what approval do you need?

(This information is taken from the Planning Portal)

What is Building Control?

Building regulations are minimum standards for design, construction and alterations to virtually every building. The regulations are developed by the UK government and approved by Parliament.

The Building Regulations 2010 cover the construction and extension of buildings and these regulations are supported by Approved Documents. Approved Documents set out detailed practical guidance on compliance with the regulations.

Building regulations approval is different from planning permission and you might need both for your project.

You can apply to any local authority building control department or Approved Inspector for building regulations approval.

If you are carrying out building work personally, it is very important that you understand how the building regulatory system and material applies to your situation as you are responsible for making sure that the work complies with the building regulations.

If you are employing a builder, the responsibility will usually be theirs – but you should confirm this at the very beginning. You should also bear in mind that if you are the owner of the building, it is ultimately you who may be served with an enforcement notice if the work does not comply with the regulations.

Some kinds of building projects are exempt from the regulations, however generally if you are planning to carry out ‘building work’ as defined in regulation 3 of the building regulations, then it must comply with the building regulations. This means that the regulations will probably apply if you want to:

  • Put up a new building
  • Extend or alter an existing one
  • Provide services and/or fittings in a building such as washing and sanitary facilities, hot water cylinders, foul water and rainwater drainage, replacement windows, and fuel-burning appliances of any type.

The works themselves must meet the relevant technical requirements in the building regulations and they must not make other fabric, services and fittings less compliant than they were before – or dangerous. For example, the provision of replacement double-glazing must not make compliance worse in relation to means of escape, air supply for combustion appliances and their flues and ventilation for health.

They may also apply to certain changes of use of an existing building. This is because the change of use may result in the building as a whole no longer complying with the requirements which will apply to its new type of use, and so having to be upgraded to meet additional requirements specified in the regulations for which building work may also be required.

In summary, the following types of project amount to ‘building work’:

  • The erection or extension of a building
  • The installation or extension of a service or fitting which is controlled under the regulations
  • An alteration project involving work which will temporarily or permanently affect the ongoing compliance of the building, service or fitting with the requirements relating to structure, fire, or access to and use of buildings
  • The insertion of insulation into a cavity wall
  • The underpinning of the foundations of a building
  • Work affecting the thermal elements, energy status or energy performance of a building.

Before commencing work you should refer to Regulation 3 of the Building Regulations for the full meaning of ‘building work’ or, if you are unsure, seek advice.

How do you get Approval?

The building regulations apply to most building work, therefore it is important to know when approval is needed.

The responsibility for checking that building regulations have been met falls to building control bodies either from the local authority or the private sector as an approved inspector. The person carrying out the work has the choice of where to get approval for the building work.

How to get approval depends on whether a local authority building control (LABC) service or an approved inspector building control service is being used.

What is Onsite Approval?

Onsite Approval – The process

If you are carrying out building work you are required, under the building regulations, to give the local authority notice of when the work has reached a particular stage. The local authority will explain about the notification procedures which the regulations require you to follow at various stages of the work.

When these stages are reached the work should pause to give the authority time to make an inspection. They will advise you if the work does not comply with the building regulations.

If the local authority is not informed of relevant stages of work for inspection it may, by notice in writing, require the work to be opened up for inspection so that it can be ascertained whether or not the work complies with the building regulations.

If a local authority believes that your building work contravenes the building regulations, they may serve you with an enforcement notice requiring you to alter or remove work which contravenes the regulations. If you believe that your work does comply, you may appeal against this notice.

Please note: The inspections which building control bodies (PCBs) undertake should not be confused with full site supervision. Inspections are only carried out at certain stages of the building work. Completion certificates or final certificates, which local authorities or approved inspectors respectively issue, are therefore not a guarantee or warranty for the building work that has been carried out.

Onsite Approval – Site Inspections

Where a local authority building control service is being used, the building regulations require that notice is given to the local authority of commencement and completion of the work and at certain other stages:

  • Commencement: at least two days before the work is commenced
  • Completion: not more than five days after the work is completed.

In respect of other stages, the notice required is (in practice) at least one whole day’s and relates to:

  • Excavation for a foundation (before covering up)
  • The foundation itself (before covering up)
  • Any damp proof course (before covering up)
  • Any concrete or material laid over a site (before covering up).

When these stages are reached the work should pause to give the authority time to make an inspection. They will advise you if the work does not comply with the building regulations.

Where a building is being erected, and that building (or part of it) is occupied before completion, the person carrying out the work is required to give the local authority at least five days notice before the occupation.

If the local authority is not informed of relevant stages of work for inspection it may, by notice in writing, require the work to be opened up for inspection so that it can be ascertained whether or not the work complies with the building regulations.

Onsite Approval – Enforcement appeals

If a local authority believes that your building work contravenes the building regulations, they may serve you with an enforcement notice requiring you to alter or remove work which contravenes the regulations. If you believe that your work does comply and wish to appeal against this notice you can:

  • Advise your local authority that you wish to obtain a written report from a suitably qualified person about the compliance of your work with a view to persuading the authority to withdraw the notice. In this event, the 28 day period given by the local authority to rectify the building work is extended to 70 days
  • Appeal against the notice in the magistrates’ court and demonstrate there that your building work complies. This option can be used either as an alternative to the above, or if proceedings under that option have been unsuccessful. You must make your appeal within 28 days of receiving the notice or within 70 days if you have used the above option first.

If you are successful with either option, your local authority may be required to pay your costs.

If on the other hand you believe that your work cannot be expected to comply with one or more of the requirements in the building regulations because they are too onerous or inapplicable, you do have the right to apply to your local authority for a relaxation or dispensation of the requirement(s) in question in order for your completed building work to be considered to achieve compliance.

Your application must be made within 28 days of receiving the enforcement notice from your authority. If they refuse your application you have a right of appeal (in England) to the Department for Communities and Local Government or, in Wales, to the Welsh Assembly Government against that refusal, providing you do so within one month of that decision. However, if you take this course of action in response to an enforcement notice, and if you have originally maintained that your work was in compliance, your case is likely to be more difficult to justify.

Pre-Site Approval

Pre-Site – Approval Introduction

If you choose to use a local authority building control service, there are three types of application for approval you can make.

There is a charge payable for these applications, which may vary between local authorities, but is regulated by the Building (local authority charges) Regulations 2010. You should contact your local authority for details of their charges.

Pre-Site Approval – Full Plans

You can apply for building regulations approval from your local authority building control service by submitting a full plans application.

An application deposited under this procedure needs to contain plans and other information showing all construction details, preferably well in advance of when work is to start on site.

Your local authority will check your plans and consult any appropriate authorities (e.g. fire and sewerage). They must complete the procedure by issuing you with a decision within five weeks or if you agree, a maximum of two months from the date of deposit.

If your plans comply with the building regulations you will receive a notice stating that they have been approved. If your local authority is not satisfied you may be asked to make amendments or provide more details. Alternatively, conditional approval may be issued. This will either specify modifications which must be made to the plans; or will specify further plans which must be deposited with your authority.

Your local authority may only apply conditions if you have either requested them to do so or have consented to them doing so. A request or consent must be made in writing. If your plans are rejected the reasons will be stated in the notice. A full plans approval notice is valid for three years from the date the plans were deposited, after which the local authority may send you a notice to declare the approval of no effect if the building work has not commenced.

Your local authority will carry out inspections of the building work once it is in progress. They will explain the notification procedures which the regulations require you to follow at various stages of the work – e.g. in connection with foundations, damp proof courses and drains. In addition, if you request one when you first make your application, the local authority will issue you with a completion certificate provided they are content that the completed work complies with the building regulations.

A further point to bear in mind is that, if a disagreement arises with your local authority, the ‘full plans’ procedure enables you to ask for a ‘determination’ from (in England) the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government or (in Wales) the Welsh Assembly Government about whether your plans do or do not comply with the building regulations.

Pre-Site Approval – Building Notice

You can apply for building regulations approval from your local authority building control service by giving a building notice.

Plans are not required with this process so it’s quicker and less detailed than the full plans application. It is designed to enable some types of building work to get underway quickly; although it is perhaps best suited to small work.

There are also specific exclusions in the regulations as to when building notices cannot be used. These are:

  • For building work in relation to a building to which the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 applies, or will apply after the completion of the building work.
  • For work which will be built close to or over the top of rainwater and foul drains shown on the ‘map of sewers’
    Where a new building will front onto a private street.

If you decide to use this procedure you need to be confident that the work will comply with the building regulations or you will risk having to correct any work you carry out if your local authority requests this. In this respect, you do not have the protection provided by the approval of ‘full plans’.

Once you have given your ‘building notice’ and informed your local authority that you are about to start work, the work will be inspected as it progresses. You will be advised by the authority if the work does not comply with the building regulations. If before the start of work, or while work is in progress, your local authority requires further information such as structural design calculations or plans, you must supply the details requested.

A ‘building notice’ is valid for three years from the date the notice was given to the local authority, after which it will automatically lapse if the building work has not commenced.

On satisfactory completion of works, a local authority will automatically issue a completion certificate under either the full plans or building notice procedure. However, it is only possible to ask for a determination when using the full plans procedure.

Pre-Site Approval – Building Notice

You can apply for building regulations approval from your local authority building control service by giving a building notice.

Plans are not required with this process so it’s quicker and less detailed than the full plans application. It is designed to enable some types of building work to get underway quickly; although it is perhaps best suited to small work.

There are also specific exclusions in the regulations as to when building notices cannot be used. These are:

  • For building work in relation to a building to which the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 applies, or will apply after the completion of the building work.
  • For work which will be built close to or over the top of rainwater and foul drains shown on the ‘map of sewers’
  • Where a new building will front onto a private street.

If you decide to use this procedure you need to be confident that the work will comply with the building regulations or you will risk having to correct any work you carry out if your local authority requests this. In this respect, you do not have the protection provided by the approval of ‘full plans’.

Once you have given your ‘building notice’ and informed your local authority that you are about to start work, the work will be inspected as it progresses. You will be advised by the authority if the work does not comply with the building regulations. If before the start of work, or while work is in progress, your local authority requires further information such as structural design calculations or plans, you must supply the details requested.

A ‘building notice’ is valid for three years from the date the notice was given to the local authority, after which it will automatically lapse if the building work has not commenced.

On satisfactory completion of works, a local authority will automatically issue a completion certificate under either the full plans or building notice procedure. However, it is only possible to ask for a determination when using the full plans procedure.

Where to get approval

Where to get approval – Introduction

The role of checking that building regulations are being complied with falls to building control bodies (PCBs).

There are two types of BCB, a local authority building control service and a private sector approved inspector building control service.

Customers are free to choose which type they use on their project and there are voluntary performance standards in place for BCBs.

If you are employing a builder to do your work you should be clear from the outset whether they are taking responsibility for ensuring that the building work complies with the building regulations, and also whether they are taking responsibility for liaising with the building control service you have decided to use. If the builder is registered with a recognised competent person scheme, they may be able to self-certify some or all the work they are carrying out.

An additional reassurance will be to use an installer and/or products that have been certified by a third-party organisation as being competent and fit for purpose. These 3rd party certification schemes are not normally an alternative to formal building regulations approval.

In addition, you should bear in mind that your building work may require planning permission. You will need to check the position and if you do require permission you will need to be clear whether you, your builder or designer are taking responsibility for obtaining it.

Some types of building development may also be subject to other types of statutory requirements and consents.

Where to get approval – Local authority building control services (LABC)

The LABC

Local authority building control teams in England and Wales help people comply with the building regulations by giving feedback on plans and providing site inspections.

The local authority has a general duty to see that building work complies with the building regulations unless it is under the control of an approved inspector. Only local authorities have the power to enforce standards if things go wrong.

Individual local authorities co-ordinate their services regionally and nationally (and provide a range of national approval schemes) via an organisation called LABC. You can find out more on the LABC website.

Use the search function on the LABC website to find building control details for any local authority.

You can find your Local Council Building Control Team here.

Local authority building control teams in England and Wales help people comply with the building regulations by giving feedback on plans and providing site inspections.

The local authority has a general duty to see that building work complies with the Building Regulations unless it is under the control of an approved inspector. Only local authorities have the power to enforce standards if things go wrong.

Individual local authorities co-ordinate their services regionally and nationally (and provide a range of national approval schemes) via an organisation called LABC. You can find out more on the LABC website.

What is the difference between Building Regulations and Planning Permission?

It is generally realised that a form of permission is required for building work or alterations of properties. However, it may not always be clear how the planning and building regulations approval regimes differ.

You may also have responsibilities under the construction health and safety regulations.

Building regulations set standards for the design and construction of buildings to ensure the safety and health for people in or about those buildings. They also include requirements to ensure that fuel and power are conserved and facilities are provided for people, including those with disabilities, to access and move around inside buildings.

Planning seeks to guide the way our towns, cities and countryside develop. This includes the use of land & buildings, the appearance of buildings, landscaping considerations, highway access and the impact that the development will have on the general environment.

For many types of building work, separate permission under both regimes (separate processes) will be required. For other building work, such as internal alterations, buildings regulations approval will probably be needed, but planning permission may not be. If you are in any doubt you should contact your local planning authority or a building control body.

If you are carrying out or having any construction or building work done, you may need to notify the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and may have other duties as well under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015). Although a domestic client does not have duties under CDM 2015, those who work for them on construction projects will.

This information is provided from research and authority websites. No liability or responsibility is accepted by Guardian Roofs. Please research local and national rules and laws for your building work, changes and alterations.

About Guardian Roofs UK

At Guardian Roofs UK we offer the next generation of home and conservatory roof replacements and extensions.

We understand that many people in the UK are unable to enjoy the space in their conservatories as they are too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter and our thermally efficient and fully insulated Guardian Warm roof will change this for them. A new Guardian Warm Roof will not only change the regulation of heat in your existing conservatory making is usable all year round it will transform the way it looks inside and out. A new Guardian Warm roof will change your existing conservatory into a new extension that looks part of your home rather than a bolt-on conservatory.

  • Our Guardian Warm Roofs are fully LABC and LABSS approved and will give you a structurally sound conservatory roof in just a few days
  • Our Velux Window instalment will give you lighter and brighter living space and will transform the way your extension or conservatory looks and feels inside and out
  • Our Guardian Home Extensions are the next generation in home extensions providing you a spacious, open-plan extension to your home in a matter of weeks not months

What are the benefits of a Guardian Warm Roof?

For many people in the Uk, their old style conservatory is too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter and it results in a space in your home that is never used. Most of this is due to their old style glass or polycarbonate roofs so replacing it with a stylish Guardian™ will transform the way it looks, feels and is used.

  • Improved modern an stylish appearance inside and out
  • Fully Insulated offering a regulated temperature all year round
  • Airtight and soundproof roof
  • Looks like an impressive extension to your home rather than a bolt-on conservatory
  • Modern, airy and bright
  • Design and technical support from start to finish
  • Rapid Installation in a few days with minimal disruption to you or your home.
  • Engineered for Quality to your specific design and measurements
  • Pre-assembled under controlled factory conditions to ensure the highest quality before its delivered to site for installation
  • Outstanding energy efficiency from high-performance insulation, saving you money on your energy bills
  • A superior U-value of only 0.18 W/m.K (England & Wales) and 0.15 W/m.K (Scotland).
  • Variety of Roof styles which offer a solid tiled roof solution for virtually any shape or size.
  • Fully bespoke replacement roof suit any shape or size
  • Great range of tiled finishes with a wide range of colours and finishes available
  • Modern plastered inside finish
  • Skylight and lighting options available
  • Increases the value of your home
  • Fully Guaranteed

What are the benefits of installing Velux Roof Windows?

Adding a Velux roof window to your conservatory or extension will transform the way it looks and feels, making it bright airy and modern.

  • Increased natural light
  • Increased airflow
  • A vast range of sizes, options and finishes
  • Bespoke design
  • Fast installation
  • Fully Guaranteed

What are the benefits of a Guardian Home Extension?

Adding an extension to your home or business gives you added living or working space that you may have been looking for without the need for moving which can be costly. If you do move house its a good idea to think if it has the potential to have a SIP extension as this may be something you want to do later down the line and in both scenarios will always add value to your home.

  • Pre-assembled, factory-engineered modular construction provides superior build quality
  • Outstanding energy-efficiency with a U-value of 1.0 W/m2K, these are the most energy-saving home extensions available.
  • Fast modern methods of construction with two to three-week build programmes and zero on-site waste
  • A vast range of colours and finishes available
  • Bespoke design to suit your needs and design ideas
  • Accelerated planning approval
  • Design and technical support from start to finish
  • Good for the environment the SIP panels use much less timber than typical timber frames and are one of the most economical and eco-friendly forms of construction
  • Thermally efficient keeping you warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Structurally insulated panel homes provide amazing thermal performance
  • A quicker and more cost-effective way to increase the space in your home or business (both in the panel fabrication and construction)
  • No issues with shrinkage or settlement and overcome cold bridging issues associated with other forms of offsite construction
  • The compact panels take up less of your floor space, maximising the space you are creating
  • Less waste is produced compared to conventional building methods
  • Airtight and soundproof walls (the insulated panels significantly reduce noise penetration)
  • Increases the value of your home or business
  • Fully Guaranteed

Guardian Roofs UK Guarantee

Full Building Control for your peace of mind

Beautiful Finishes to compliment your home

Energy Efficiency, saving you money

Fast Installation for your convenience

If you are thinking about adding a new extension to your home, replacing your conservatory roof, installing Velux roof windows or have any questions about Permitted Development for any of these then please give us a call on 0845 867 1384 or email us at info@guardianroofsuk.co.uk and one of our Guardian experts will be able to answer any questions you may have.